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Thread: Intelligence, even humor, et al in nature

  1. #1

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    In spite of everything mankind has done to put a stop to it, nature buzzes and sings and shines with not only life and joy but startling intelligence. Lots of birds' songs sound like "real music," however elemental, but there was one outside my window recently that was actually singing a small composition over and over on the 3 notes of the Ab major triad, in "jig" (or "scherzo") time and rhythm, like this:


    Eb C Ab Eb C Ab Eb C Ab Eb C


    all notes being shall we say 8th notes except the last a quarter.


    Then there's the mockingbird who on other recent mornings has sung through her whole repertoire for us...... a long repertoire in which she seemed to do all her calls once, with no repetition. I confess such shows of animal brilliance just wow me.


    Then there's plant brilliance and even rock brilliance. Blake poetized (most aptly, it would seem in view of today's subatomic knowledge) about finding "eternity in a grain of sand," and how many tomes could be written about the morphology, chemistry, metabolism, growth etc. of a single blade of grass?


    Is it not humbling -- or mortifying -- that every spider knows more about structural and project engineering than the average well-educated adult person? (You note I don't say "human" there, purelybecause of what liberals and evolutionists have done to the word.[img]smileys/smiley2.gif[/img])


    Edited by: nelson

  2. #2

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    I was visiting friends and one reported that a bird outside the window had just started mimicking the beep of her cell phone -- and then heard and imitated the beep from their stove through another window, then started singing the two in sequence. [img]smileys/smiley32.gif[/img]


    We can't prove that critters have a sense of humor, but it seems obvious to me that they (certainly the birds) have a blast of a time most of their waking hours.



  3. #3
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    How symbolic!


    As with the holohoax itself, the proponents' only response is "Of course it's cracking, we planned for that," "Situation normal," etc. etc. etc.


    Received without source or link, from one of our topmost leaders no less! Tsk tsk,,,,
    <DIV>Widespread Cracking Found in Berlin's Holocaust Memorial</DIV>
    <DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>A surprising number of cracks have been found in Berlin's 2-year-old memorial to Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Germans are asking what is to blame. AP</DIV>


    IT WAS hailed as a design that could withstand attacks from neo-Nazis and even graffiti artists. But in the end, the memorial couldn't be protected from the materials used to build it ... or the weather.


    An estimated 400 cracks have appeared in the 2,711 concrete slabs of the 2-year-old Holocaust memorial in Berlin.


    The memorial, known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, is dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Nazi regime in World War II. It was designed by American architect Peter Eisenman and erected by the firm Geithner Bau from 2003 to 2005 at a cost of ¤10.5 million ($14.5 million).


    "It's really not a surprise at all," said a spokesman for the Foundation Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, which oversees the memorial. "We already had it written up in the contract with the producer that this would probably happen."


    The cause of the cracking, which first appeared shortly after the memorial opened, is not known for sure, though it might be due to extreme temperature fluctuations in 2005 and 2006, according to the spokesman...............Edited by: Nelson
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  4. #4

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    This would definitely fall under the humor part:

    They have six small, ineffectual legs—to move, they roll onto their backs and
    propel themselves upside down, using the stiff dark hairs on their backs to gain
    traction. </span><br style="color: rgb(102, 0, 0);">
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_bug_(insect)



  5. #5

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    http://www.newsoftheweird.com/archive/nw110109.html


    Swinging bachelors often try to impress potential mates with their fancy cars, houses and jewelry, and it appears that male bowerbirds of Papua New Guinea employ a similar mating strategy by building elaborate tree homes. National Geographic magazine noted in July that the birds can "build a hut that looks like a doll's house" or "arrange flowers, leaves and mushrooms in such an artistic manner" that researchers liken them to the craftsmanship of humans. Biologists observed females gravitating to males who had such structures as a three-foot tower of twigs, nuts and beetles, decorated with "garlands of caterpillar feces glistening with dew." [National Geographic, July 2010]



  6. #6

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    I admire "wild" animals. I really do. DId you know they never eat store-bought food or need to go to the doctor?


    FP:


    NewsLink• Science
    Prairie Dog Language
    02-05-2011 • arclein
    s a language that would twist the tongue of even the most sophisticated linguist. Prairie dogs talk to each other and can describe what different human beings look like, according to scientists. The species - only found in North America - call ou
    Read CommentsMake a CommentEmail this News LinkSend Letter to Editor

  7. #7

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    <h2 style="color: rgb(102, 0, 0);">Dog knew heart attacking was coming</h2>
    Posted By Staff


    <div style="color: rgb(102, 0, 0);" ="info">

    <div ="main">

    Date: March 10th, 2011</div>

    <div ="main">

    1 Comment</div>

    <div ="main">

    Category: Nutty News</div>



    </div>
    Nutty
    News Portland, Oregon - A fiercely protective elderly mutt is up for a
    national hero award for pestering her owner in the hours before he had
    a heart attack and then barking for help once it struck. Ceili, a
    15-year-old Lab mix, usually spends much of her day lounging in her
    North Portland home. But one day she stuck by her owner, Danny Fincher,
    trotting behind him from room to room, sometimes blocking his path.
    When he sat down, she licked his arms and legs and then jumped on his
    easy chair, sniffing his breath. “She was driving me nuts,” he said.
    Moments later, Fincher suffered the heart attack. More…


  8. #8
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    This would be the "et al" category of our heading! :-x 8-z ;-3

    http://www.newsoftheweird.com/archive/index.html

    Intelligent Design: If the male nursery web spider were a human, he would be sternly denounced as a vulgar cad. Researcher Maria Jose Albo of Denmark's Aarhus University told Live Science in November that the spiders typically obtain sex by making valuable "gifts" to females (usually, high-nutrition insects wrapped in silk), but if lacking resources, a male cleverly packages a fake gift (usually a piece of flower) also in silk but confoundingly wound so as to distract her as she unwraps it -- and then mounts her before she discovers the hoax. Albo also found that the male is not above playing dead to coax the female into relaxing her guard as she approaches the "carcass" -- only to be jumped from behind for sex. [Yahoo News-Live Science, 11-14-2011]

  9. #9
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    Variation on the "octopus's garden" theme!

    Intelligent Design: If the male nursery web spider were a human, he would be sternly denounced as a vulgar cad. Researcher Maria Jose Albo of Denmark's Aarhus University told Live Science in November that the spiders typically obtain sex by making valuable "gifts" to females (usually, high-nutrition insects wrapped in silk), but if lacking resources, a male cleverly packages a fake gift (usually a piece of flower) also in silk but confoundingly wound so as to distract her as she unwraps it -- and then mounts her before she discovers the hoax. Albo also found that the male is not above playing dead to coax the female into relaxing her guard as she approaches the "carcass" -- only to be jumped from behind for sex. [Yahoo News-Live Science, 11-14-2011]
    http://www.newsoftheweird.com/archive/nw120108.html

  10. #10
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    I've tried twice to delete the above duplicate -- no luck.

  11. #11
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    http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/f...07-briefs.html

    The Venus flytrap has long been known to catch its dinner, snapping shut when an insect touches the tiny hairs on its leaves. Now scientists are realizing that a wide variety of plants exhibit behaviors. “I was raised to believe that plants are plants: You eat them, you grow them, and they look pretty,” says University of Alberta ecologist J.C. Cahill. He’s among those starting to change that viewpoint.

    Scientists have discovered, for instance, that some plants distinguish predator insects from pollinators, or strengthen and elongate their roots through dry soil. Plants also give off electrical impulses in response to threats. Polygraph expert and former CIA interrogation specialist Cleve Backster confirmed this when, on an impulse, he hooked up a tropical dracaena to a polygraph and threatened the plant with a flame. The dracaena displayed the same electrical signals that people do when they lie. From lettuce to bananas, the results were similar.

    Biologists Ian Baldwin and Jack Schultz have published work suggesting that some plants can communicate through the air. When the researchers threatened poplars and maples they found that nearby trees with no physical contact released defensive chemicals that inhibit digestion, thus hindering predators’ ability to consume the trees’ leaves or bark.


    "While some consider the plant to be a weed, its roots are food for bears, who eat it after hibernating as a laxative or cathartic."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Skunk_Cabbage

    In other words, "dumb" animals know how to medicate themselves.
    Last edited by Nelson4; 05-10-2013 at 08:16 PM.

  12. #12
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    NotW

    "Pig Drinks 18 Pints and Has Fight With Cow" read one August headline from Port Hedland, West Australia, after rampaging wild pigs stole and drank 18 beers from a campsite. International Business Times, summarizing recent research in September, noted that moose, especially, are attracted by fermenting apples; that prairie voles are prominent social drinkers (consuming much more available alcohol when other voles are around); and that African elephants often turn violent to secure the fermenting fruit of the marula tree (although the elephant would require 1,400 pieces of fruit to generate the seven gallons of alcohol that -- if consumed all at once -- would match humans' legal limit for driving). [International Business Times (New York), 9-10-2013]

  13. #13

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  15. #15
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    There's a distinct possibility that plants are literally smarter than humans.

    http://www.wakingtimes.com/2014/03/1...-ever-assumed/
    Plants Are Far More Intelligent Than We Ever Assumed

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